5 Things to Know About Elevator Maintenance

Posted on October 11th, 2019 by Mariel Nowack

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Your elevators need to go up and down, your costs to maintain them should not.

Putting a maintenance plan and service contract in place for your elevators will ensure optimal safety, decreased liability, and increased budget assurance.

Here are the 5 key things to keep in mind when it comes to elevator maintenance.

1. Types of Service Contracts

Elevator maintenance service contracts come in many shapes and sizes. Elevator maintenance service providers offer a variety of service contracts based on your required level of service. Each service provider decides what they offer in their contract and you can chose based on your needs. Some service providers may be more flexible than others.

  • Full service: A Soup-to-nuts agreement that will provide you the comfort of knowing exactly how much you’ll pay each month to keep your elevator running. Consider this similar to an insurance policy. This typically includes major parts and labor for on-demand and preventative maintenance.
  • Partial service: This contract includes a fixed maintenance scope of work and schedule with some parts and labor included. Any work outside of the written scope will be billed separately, so the total cost is less predictable than a full service contract.
  • Basic service: If you’re looking for a bare-bones level of service that meets minimum code, this is it. This might include a specific number of inspections and lubrication of the moving parts. Any work outside of the basic scope would be billed separately for parts and labor. This leaves a lot of responsibility on the facility team to monitor the inspection reports and anticipate upcoming repairs. The cost of this type of contract is fixed, but your overall budget will be hard to predict.
benefits of an elevator service service contract

2. Code Compliance

Your elevator service provider should be up to date and well informed of codes and regulations set by accreditation associations. The two major associations that set standards for elevators are the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) and The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). These national associations set standards and your local authority having jurisdiction will set local code and regulation for your building.

Connecticut Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators

3. Elevator Maintenance Control Program. Is is required?

Yes. It improves safety and prevents failure by setting an expectation and list of tasks for maintenance, inspections, and tests. Every elevator needs one!

“On January 3, 2018 Connecticut has adopted the ASME A17.1-2013 Elevator Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators.  Please note the major changes:  

Maintenance Control Program:

A written Maintenance Control Program for each elevator or escalator shall be installed on-site in each machine room or machine space, provided by the person(s) and or firm who is maintaining the equipment.  The MCP shall include all maintenance, repair, replacement and testing records of such equipment…”

https://portal.ct.gov/DAS/Office-of-State-Building-Inspector/Safety-Code-for-Elevators-and-Escalators

4. Inspections and Safety Testing

Check with your local authority having jurisdiction for requirements by law. This may include a semi-annual, annual, and 5-year test to ensure absolute operational safety.

FM Pro Tip

Do your research to make sure your provider has the proper certifications and licenses. Here’s a list: http://www.elevatorsource.com/Connecticut-elevator.htm

5. Lubrication & Available Parts

An elevator has a lot of moving parts! There is nothing more important than to keep ’em moving smoothly. Regularly lubricating operational parts is a simple preventative maintenance task that will save you time, money, and unpredictable repairs over the life of the elevator. Another quick tip is to make sure your service provider has spare parts easily available for quick repairs.

via GIPHY

Additional Resources:

Learn the Lingo: Check out this resource from ThyssenKrup! It’s a full glossary of elevator terms. There will not be a quiz but there might be a spelling bee!

Elevator Life Cycle Principles: Maintain, Modernize, and Extend the Service Life of an Elevator

From ElevatorLab.com

10 Tips for your Elevator Maintenance Contract

Elevator Service: 5 Steps To Data-Driven Results

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This entry was posted on Friday, October 11th, 2019 and is filed under Facility Management Pro Tip, FM Resources, Maintenance Checklists, Standard Operating Procedures. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.

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